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Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer (15)

breast cancer risk ribbonWomen who regularly work into the early hours can be nearly four times as likely to develop breast cancer, according to the findings published online in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Sunday, 16 June 2013 00:00
Published in Breast Cancer
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PomegranatesEating fruit, such as pomegranates, that contain anti-aromatase phytochemicals reduces the incidence of hormone-dependent breast cancer, according to new research published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

Published in Breast Cancer
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girls-drinking-alcoholAdding to research linking alcohol to breast cancer risk, a new study shows that adolescent girls with a family history of breast disease, either cancer or the benign lesions that can become cancer, have a higher risk of developing benign breast disease as young women than other girls. And unlike girls without a family history, this already-elevated risk rises with increasing alcohol consumption.

Wednesday, 15 February 2012 20:40
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breast_cancer_deoderantConcerns about antiperspirants and deodorants being link to breast cancer were started by an e-mail. The e-mail claimed that antiperspirants stop your body from sweating out poisons. But do antiperspirants really increase a person's chances of developing breast cancer?

Published in Breast Cancer

breast_cancer_deoderantConcerns about antiperspirants and deodorants being link to breast cancer were started by an e-mail. The e-mail claimed that antiperspirants stop your body from sweating out poisons. But do antiperspirants really increase a person's chances of developing breast cancer?

Published in Breast Cancer

woman_holding_pillsWomen who receive one common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), pain drug during mastectomy are less likely to develop recurrent breast cancer in the years following mastectomy surgery, suggests a study published in Anesthesia & Analgesia. The study adds to a growing body of evidence that anesthetic and analgesic drug choices may, through their effects on the immune system, have a positive impact on the outcomes of cancer surgery.

Published in Breast Cancer

Researchers say they could not find any substantial change in the incidence of braincellbooth tumors as a result of cell phone usage among a study group of 60,000 people. 

Cell phones have been mentioned for years as possible causes of brain tumors, but the new study, published in the  the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, found no cell phone-related increase the incidence of brain tumors during the study period. The American Cancer Society says that in looking at most studies as a whole, no link between cell phones and tumor development has been found.

Published in Breast Cancer
BonivaWomen who take some types of bone-building drugs used to prevent and treat osteoporosis may be at lower risk of breast cancer, according to a study by U.S. researchers published today in the British Journal of Cancer.
Published in Breast Cancer

Tamoxifen and RaloxifeneIn an update of the 19,490-patient Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 trial in breast cancer prevention, both raloxifene and tamoxifen remain effective options to prevent breast cancer at 81 months of follow-up.

According to the follow-up study Raloxifene improved its effectiveness against noninvasivebreast cancer, caused significantly less endometrial cancers, 36% fewer uterine cancers, 29% fewer blood and was significantly less toxic than Tamoxifen (Tamoxifen increases the risk of cataracts, Raloxifene does not; While both Tamoxifen and Raloxifene can cause  blood clots in veins and the lungs, that side effect was more common with tamoxifen than Raloxifene.).

Published in Breast Cancer
thin girl on scaleWomen who were thin as young girls are at increased risk for breast cancer as they age compared to women who were larger during adolescence, according to a new study  appearing in the April 15, 2010 journal Breast Cancer Research.

Researchers examined the link between childhood body size and tumor characteristics in over 2,800 Swedish breast cancer patients and a control group of more than 3,100 women without breast cancer.

Published in Breast Cancer

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